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Tuesday, 23 January 2018 14:13

Youth agents for change in nation developmental processes

Written by  Gladys Kamakanda
Hon. Francis Kasaila with EU Ambassador to Malawi, Marchel Germann hold the  booklet of Youth Well-Being Policy Review of Malawi at Crossroads Hotel in Lilongwe- Hon. Francis Kasaila with EU Ambassador to Malawi, Marchel Germann hold the booklet of Youth Well-Being Policy Review of Malawi at Crossroads Hotel in Lilongwe- (c) Abel Ikiloni, mana

 

Lilongwe, January 23, 2018: Government says that the youth have potential, as agents of change, if proper investments are made for them to develop and participate in political and developmental processes of any nation.

Minister of Labour, Youth, Sports and Manpower Development (MoLYSMD) Francis Kasaila made the remarks Tuesday in Lilongwe during the launch of the Youth Well-Being Policy Review of Malawi.

He said Government had put in place the necessary institutions and policies for youth development, MoLYSMD and the National Youth Council of Malawi are two Government agencies mandated to coordinate youth activities in the country.

“My Ministry has already started responding to some of the gaps raised in the report, especially as it relates to coordination of stakeholders in the subsector, to better respond to the need and aspirations of young people,” Kasaila explained.

The Minister observed that this is to address the issues of silo programming, as a result of weak coordination and realizing that youth issues fall or anchored in different portfolios, a Principal Secretaries’ Inter-ministerial Committee on Adolescents and Youth was established.

Kasaila added that the committee draws membership from all Government Ministries that have youth programs.

EU Ambassador to Malawi Marchel Gerrmann said that according to the Youth Well-Being Policy Review report which has been produced as part of the project, 46 per cent of country’s  population is under 15 years old while the youth  between 15 – 29 years represents more than a quarter of the population.

He said the population growth rate remains one of the highest in the region at three per cent per year, resulting in about 500,000 additional children every year.

“15 per cent of the young women aged 20 – 24 were married by 18, while more than 25 per cent of the girls between 15 – 19 years old have already begun childbearing,” Gerrmann noted.

According to Gerrmann, it is project that at current population growth rates in the country will have a population of 45 million in 2050.

He said that these alarming figures will have a severe impact on society, natural resources and social services such as health care and education and that there is a need to work together to reduce population growth in Malawi as it is clearly not sustainable.