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Friday, 12 January 2018 16:16

Bursaries: Catalyst for girls’ retention in school

Written by  Cosmas Chimaliro
Girls like these to have a bright future if they attend school - File Photo Girls like these to have a bright future if they attend school - File Photo

Mzuzu, January 12, 2018: A total of 6,366 vulnerable girls in some secondary schools in Mzimba North Education Division have received bursaries and retained in school since 2012, courtesy of Campaign for Female Education (Camfed) Project.

Orienting Community Development Committees (CDC) for Mzimba North, Camfed’s District Operations Officer, Henry Tembo, said the organization’s bursaries have played a big role in retaining girls in school.

“The bursary package includes school fees, writing materials and sanitary wear which are deemed to be crucial requirements for a girl child to remain in school,” said Tembo.

The project, which commenced in the district in 2012, ensures that girl children are educated and protected the ravages of poverty and challenges perpetrated by cultural values and practices.

Tembo said regardless of registering success, the project his encountering a number of challenges including increased number of girls requesting for bursaries.

Camfed is targeting 87 secondary schools, both public and private in Mzimba North Education division in addition to other schools outside the district such as Kaseye Girls Secondary School in Chitipa and St Mary’s Girls Secondary School in Karonga.

Camfed, which has fundraising and technical support offices in United Kingdom and United States of America, is operating in 17 districts across the country.

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